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The Best of The Onion

“The Onion is laugh-out-loud, go-tell-your-friends, get-angry-you-didn’t-think-of-it funny.” –Conan O’Brien

“Outside of maybe Dario Fo, an Italian who few are sure exists, the Onion people make the most consistently perfect and excoriating social commentary we currently have. But will those Nobel bastards honor them, too? Only God, our merciless and just God, knows.” –Dave Eggers

“The funniest publication in the United States.” –The New Yorker

“This publication is tasteless and destructive to our shared values. Read it for yourself and you’ll see what I mean. Seriously, what else could make me laugh–much less laugh uproariously–while being offended week after week after week?” –Al Gore

“The Onion is the funniest thing in news since Dan Rather’s spooky stare.” –Matt Groening

“Brutal satire that rushes into the far reaches of race, class, sexuality, and culture where many publications–and critics–fear to tread.” –Chicago Tribune

“The Onion, unlike any other entity in our media culture, offers a refreshingly honest look at our complicated life.” –Ken Burns

Found via: Ideal Bookshelf

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Seminal Photographic Books of the Twentieth Century

The history of the photographic book goes back well more than a century; the medium of photography and the book format were understood very early on to relate to each other on both technical and aesthetic levels. The examples of truly great combinations of photographic image and text, great design and typography bound together as books are numerous, and make up an impressive artistic, social, and documentary statement of the 20th century. Writer and rare book expert Andrew Roth has selected for this volume a group of 101 of the best photography books ever published: books that bring all of the elements of great bookmaking together to create, ultimately, a thing of beauty, a work of art. Mostly made up of publications in which the photographs were meant to be seen in book form, as opposed to the book being merely a repository of images, this list includes many artists and titles that will be familiar to the collector, but also not a few surprises. Chronologically, the first book is Volume One of Edward Curtis's seminal 1907 The North American Indian, the last is David LaChapelle's LaChapelle Land from 1996, and in between are books by Walker Evans and Berenice Abbott, Atget and Brassai, Robert Frank and Garry Winogrand, and many other seminal photographers from all over the world. Each book in the catalogue receives a double page spread including publication information, several image spreads, and a short text about it. The Book of 101 Books, however, is far more than simply an annotated and illustrated catalogue. Six important new essays on a variety of related topics from respected scholars, critics, and artists are included as well: here you will find Richard Benson on the history of printing techniques, Shelley Rice on the societal significance of photography books, May Castleberry on reprints, exhibitions, and keeping books alive for the public; Daido Moriyama on his personal memories of making his classic Bye Bye Photography, Dear, Neville Wakefield on the particular attributes of one of the most recent books in this group: Richard Princeis 1995 Adult Comedy Action Drama, and Jeffrey Fraenkel on the myriad perils of publishing photography books. The catalogue entries themselves are written by the well known critics Vince Aletti and David Levi Strauss. Taken together, the depth and beauty of these essays and images makes The Book of 101 Books both an essential reference and an aesthetically compelling object. In order to insure safe delivery for this item we can only ship Federal Express 3rd Day. An additional charge of $25.00 will be added to your purchase.

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Born in 1951 in an affluent Tokyo suburb, Hajime—beginning in Japanese—has arrived at middle age wanting for almost nothing. The postwar years have brought him a fine marriage, two daughters, and an enviable career as the proprietor of two jazz clubs. Yet a nagging sense of inauthenticity about his success threatens Hajime’s happiness. And a boyhood memory of a wise, lonely girl named Shimamoto clouds his heart.

In South of the Border, West of the Sun, the simple arc of a man’s life—with its attendant rhythms of success and disappointment—becomes the exquisite literary terrain of Haruki Murakami’s most haunting work. When Shimamoto shows up one rainy night, now a breathtaking beauty with a secret from which she is unable to escape, the fault lines of doubt in Hajime’s quotidian existence begin to give way. And the details of stolen moments past and present—a Nat King Cole melody, a face pressed against a window, a handful of ashes drifting downriver to the sea—threaten to undo him completely. Rich, mysterious, quietly dazzling, South of the Border, West of the Sun is Haruki Murakami’s wisest and most compelling work.

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In this sequel to his award-winning Empire of the Sun, young James returns to England at the end of World War II. He stumbles through medical study at Cambridge, trains briefly as an RAF pilot in Canada, and marries. When his wife dies suddenly, Jim is thrust into the violence and sexual promiscuity of the sixties. Penetrating and wise, J. G. Ballard's biting social commentary and pushing of boundaries make this semi-autobiographical novel a small classic.

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Once

Wim Wenders ranks among the greatest artistic minds of contemporary film: over the past 30 years his films have consistently demonstrated such clarity and sensitivity that they have transcended boundaries of language and nationality, finding a devoted audience worldwide. Wenders brings to this collection of photographic essays the same literary and cinematic talents, the same command of the art of storytelling that we find in his films. In the tradition of Paris, Texas and Faraway, So Close, the texts and pictures in Once weave ambiguous and moving narratives in fits of rhythmic prose and inventive imagery. Prefaced by Wenders' poetic meditations on the metaphysics of photography and film, Once consists of short, autobiographical sketches relating Wenders' experiences--both meaningful and apparently trivial--on his trips across the world scouting locations for his films, as well as photographs taken during these excursions. The resulting book is at once travel diary, photo album, and a series of short films or short stories--revealing the views and sentiments of an auteur inspired by the poetry of the eye and the melody of speech. Fascinating and revelatory, Once gives us a unique look at the universe Wenders has created out of the hidden pieces of everyday life.

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LE CORBUSIER LE GRAND is the only book you'll ever need on the world's most influential architect.

''He is the Leonardo of our time.'' - Eero Saarinen

''He has provided enough for a whole generation to live on.'' - Walter Gropius

''The world's greatest architect.'' - Oscar Niemeyer

''Without question No. 1.'' - Philip Johnson

Le Corbusier (1887-1965) is known as of one of the giants of twentieth-century architecture and design. The Swiss-born, self-named architect was not only the creator of some of the most impressive buildings of the last century, he was also an accomplished painter, sculptor, furniture designer, urbanist, and author. His work and social theories continue to be a dominant force today, and his elegant manner, typified by his iconic round black eyeglasses, is still the signature look for architects around the world. Only a book grand in size could encapsulate such a legendary figure.

Phaidon Press is pleased to announce the publication of LE CORBUSIER LE GRAND, a spectacular visual biography of the life and work of the father of Modern architecture. Weighing in at 20 pounds, this massive book is packed with 2,000 images and documents, many rare or previously unpublished. Drawing on an array of archival materials, this sumptuous volume depicts not only the vast and varied output of Le Corbusier, but also the major events, people, and forces that shaped the life of a man who continues to fascinate those in and outside the architectural world.

LE CORBUSIER LE GRAND follows the same dramatically oversized design of the critically acclaimed Andy Warhol Giant Size (Phaidon, 2006). The large format enables the reader to explore in detail a myriad of fascinating photographs, letters, personal correspondence, art works, notes, press clippings, sketches, and ephemera all featured in this one of a kind publication. The rarely seen photographs and correspondence shed new light on Le Corbusier's relationships with Josephine Baker, Eileen Gray, Fernand Léger, Pablo Picasso, and many others. A separate booklet includes transcriptions and translations (from French to English) of all featured documents.

LE CORBUSIER LE GRAND includes an insightful introductory essay by Jean-Louis Cohen, one of the world's most authoritative architectural historians, and incisive chapter introductions by Tim Benton, a highly regarded Le Corbusier scholar. This luxurious book is a striking addition to any coffee table, making it an extraordinary gift for anyone with an interest in art, architecture, or design.

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One of Switzerland's most important graphic designers, Josef Muller-Brockman is the father of functional, objective design. This monograph gives a visual understanding of his growth as a graphic designer. It is useful for those interested in the history of graphic design, design students, and professional designers."

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Pop artist David Shrigley's work is immediate, sometimes rude, and very funny, "like a psychotic version of Matt Groening's 'Life in Hell' cartoons" (The Guardian). His darkly brilliant, addictively hilarious scrawls from the subconscious have already made him a star in the UK, with a growing legion of fans around the globe. The Book of Shrigley is the most extensiveand the first widely availableshowcase of his edgy but accessible off-kilter vision. Here are bad-tempered pets, strange attractions, work, S-E-X, knitting, wrestling, and a host of other everyday activities, dangers, and amusements laid bare in Shrigley's urgently illustrated panels and wickedly mischievous punch lines. Made up of almost entirely new work and bursting with color and unsettlingly funny truths, The Book of Shrigley is the ideal introduction to this comic genius and the book fans have been waiting for.

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Atlas

This monumental and comprehensive publication maps the ideas, processes, life and times of one of the most important painters of our time. Conceived and closely edited by Gerhard Richter himself, Atlas cuts straight to the heart of the artist’s thinking, collecting more than 5,000 photographs, drawings and sketches that he has compiled or created since the moment of his creative breakthrough in 1962. Year by year, the images closely parallel the subjects of Richter’s paintings, revealing the orderly but open-ended analysis that has been so central to his art. Offering invaluable insight into Richter’s working process, this encyclopedic new edition, which completely revises and updates the rare, out-of-print 1997 edition and includes 147 additional plates, features 780 multi-image panels, each reproduced full page and in full color. Richter redefined the terms of contemporary painting as he looked to photography for a way to release painting from the political and symbolic burdens of Socialist Realism and Abstract Expressionism. From pictures of family and friends to images from the mass media, Richter’s photographs--sometimes found, sometimes original--have provided the basis for many of his paintings, often re-emerging in a luminous, monochromatic palette, and falling ambiguously between documentary and historical painting.

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Roses

Visionaire, the limited-edition fashion and art publication, offers a rare opportunity to view the never-before-seen collection of personal work by renowned photographer David Sims. Sims, known primarily for his strong fashion images, creates a stunning series of photographs evoking the darkness and beauty of the rose, magnifying its scars and perfections, resulting in an inspiring, moving, and memorable body of work. The images are printed as individual art works and included in a custom designed case.

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The most influential unpublished work in the history of psychology. When Carl Jung embarked on an extended self-exploration he called his “confrontation with the unconscious,” the heart of it was The Red Book, a large, illuminated volume he created between 1914 and 1930. Here he developed his principle theories—of the archetypes, the collective unconscious, and the process of individuation—that transformed psychotherapy from a practice concerned with treatment of the sick into a means for higher development of the personality.

While Jung considered The Red Book to be his most important work, only a handful of people have ever seen it. Now, in a complete facsimile and translation, it is available to scholars and the general public. It is an astonishing example of calligraphy and art on a par with The Book of Kells and the illuminated manuscripts of William Blake. This publication of The Red Book is a watershed that will cast new light on the making of modern psychology. 212 color illustrations.

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The Definitive Edition

The culmination of a lifetime of scholarship, The Annotated Alice is a landmark event in the rich history of Lewis Carroll and cause to celebrate the remarkable career of Martin Gardner.

For over half a century, Martin Gardner has established himself as one of the world's leading authorities on Lewis Carroll. His Annotated Alice, first published in 1959, has over half a million copies in print around the world and is beloved by both families and scholars―for it was Gardner who first decoded many of the mathematical riddles and wordplay that lay ingeniously embedded in Carroll's two classic stories, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.

Forty years after this groundbreaking publication, Norton is proud to publish the Definitive Edition of The Annotated Alice, a work that combines the notes of Gardner's 1959 edition with his 1990 volume, More Annotated Alice, as well as additional discoveries drawn from Gardner's encyclopedic knowledge of the texts. Illustrated with John Tenniel's classic, beloved art―along with many recently discovered Tenniel pencil sketches―The Annotated Alice will be Gardner's most beautiful and enduring tribute to Carroll's masterpieces yet.

Color, two-tone, and black-and-white photos and illustrations throughout

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The Dandelion Room

A central figure of the new wave of German photography that first arrived in the 1970s, Thomas Struth has continued to impact the world of photography with his large-scale museum interiors, portraits, and architectural photography. Struth has emerged as one of the most compelling voices in contemporary art's critique of the subject and the socio-economic order by creating images that are at once visually arresting and subtly political. This new monograph presents another facet of Struth's oeuvre, assembling a series of flower photographs produced for a unique project. In 1991, Struth was commissioned to decorate a new hospital in Winterthur, Switzerland. He decided to produce a two flower photographs and a landscape for each of the 37 sickrooms. The flower photographs were to be hung on the wall behind the bed, the landscape on the opposite wall. With this project, Struth hoped to bring the captivating environment of the Winterthur area into the interior space of the hospital, connecting patients to the outside word. The images for the hospital shift between documentary objectivity and painterly qualities of light and shadow. Beautifully reproduced here, these pictures brilliantly and colorfully synthesize a tradition of landscape photography that includes Edward Weston, Walker Evans, and August Sander with the tradition of 19th century flower and landscape painting.

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Representing a new generation of designers in Japan, Kenya Hara (born 1958) pays tribute to his mentors, using long overlooked Japanese icons and images in much of his work. In Designing Design, he impresses upon the reader the importance of "emptiness" in both the visual and philosophical traditions of Japan, and its application to design, made visible by means of numerous examples from his own work: Hara for instance designed the opening and closing ceremony programs for the Nagano Winter Olympic games 1998. In 2001, he enrolled as a board member for the Japanese label MUJI and has considerably moulded the identity of this successful corporation as communication and design advisor ever since. Kenya Hara, among the leading design personalities in Japan, has also called attention to himself with exhibitions such as Re-Design: the Daily products of the 21st Century of 2000.

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"It took me a long time and most of the world to learn what I know about love and fate and the choices we make, but the heart of it came to me in an instant, while I was chained to a wall and being tortured."

So begins this epic, mesmerizing first novel by Gregory David Roberts, set in the underworld of contemporary Bombay. Shantaram is narrated by Lin, an escaped convict with a false passport who flees maximum security prison in Australia for the teeming streets of a city where he can disappear.

Accompanied by his guide and faithful friend, Prabaker, the two enter Bombay's hidden society of beggars and gangsters, prostitutes and holy men, soldiers and actors, and Indians and exiles from other countries, who seek in this remarkable place what they cannot find elsewhere.

As a hunted man without a home, family, or identity, Lin searches for love and meaning while running a clinic in one of the city's poorest slums, and serving his apprenticeship in the dark arts of the Bombay mafia. The search leads him to war, prison torture, murder, and a series of enigmatic and bloody betrayals. The keys to unlock the mysteries and intrigues that bind Lin are held by two people. The first is Khader Khan: mafia godfather, criminal-philosopher-saint, and mentor to Lin in the underworld of the Golden City. The second is Karla: elusive, dangerous, and beautiful, whose passions are driven by secrets that torment her and yet give her a terrible power.

Burning slums and five-star hotels, romantic love and prison agonies, criminal wars and Bollywood films, spiritual gurus and mujaheddin guerrillas---this huge novel has the world of human experience in its reach, and a passionate love for India at its heart. Based on the life of the author, it is by any measure the debut of an extraordinary voice in literature.

Found via: Ideal Bookshelf

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