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Stefan Sagmeister's Bookcase

Stefan Sagmeister (born August 6, 1962) is a New York-based graphic designer and typographer. Sagmeister co-founded a design firm called Sagmeister & Walsh Inc. with Jessica Walsh in New York City. He has designed album covers for Lou Reed, OK Go, The Rolling Stones, David Byrne, Jay Z, Aerosmith and Pat Metheny.

Photo by: Simon Zirkunow

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The Photographs of Edward Burtynsky

Over a period of 25 years, the internationally renowned Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky has been an explorer of unfamiliar places where human activity has reshaped the surface of the land. His astonishing large-scale colour photographs of the landscapes of mining, quarrying, railcutting, recycling, oil refining and shipbreaking uncover a stark, almost sublime beauty in the residue of industrial progress. The implicit social and environmental upheavals that underlie these images make them powerful emblems of our times.

Found via: Ideal Bookshelf

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anothermountainman

Anothermountainman (aka Stanley Wong Ping-pui) expresses his distinctive view of the city through a camera lens. His works are uniquely local, exuding a passion for Hong Kong as well as his unwillingness to compromise in his exploration of the real - not idealised - 'Pearl of the Orient'. His down-to-earth approach and love for social phenomena allow him to expose the true heart of Hong Kong, and to touch those who want an unflinching account of the city. Anothermountainman's photographs are of iconic people - including the late calligraphy-graffiti artist Tsang Tsou-choi - and iconic places, including the Cenotaph, Oil Street (an area occupied by artists in the 1990s), and even decrepit lanweilou (unfinished and abandoned buildings) in China. With them, Anothermountainman offers an alternative version of beauty - the touching beauty of presence and absence.

Found via: Ideal Bookshelf

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Schreiber, Dichter, Zeichner, Componist

Adolf Wölfli (February 29, 1864 - November 6, 1930) was a Swiss artist who was one of the first artists to be associated with the Art Brut or outsider art label. The images Wölfli produced were complex, intricate and intense. They worked to the very edges of the page with detailed borders. In a manifestation of Wölfli's "horror vacui", every empty space was filled with two small holes. Wölfli called the shapes around these holes his "birds." His images also incorporated an idiosyncratic musical notation. This notation seemed to start as a purely decorative affair but later developed into real composition which Wölfli would play on a paper trumpet. Full of color, intensity and detail, the paintings and drawings of Wolfli blur the lines between insanity and creativity.

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Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom

In his widely praised book, award-winning psychologist Jonathan Haidt examines the world’s philosophical wisdom through the lens of psychological science, showing how a deeper understanding of enduring maxims-like Do unto others as you would have others do unto you, or What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger-can enrich and even transform our lives.

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What I Loved begins in New York in 1975, when art historian Leo Hertzberg discovers an extraordinary painting by an unknown artist in a SoHo gallery. He buys the work; tracks down the artist, Bill Wechsler; and the two men embark on a life-long friendship. Leo's story, which spans twenty-five years, follows the growing involvement between his family and Bill's--an intricate constellation of attachments that includes the two men, their wives, Erica and Violet, and their sons, Matthew and Mark.

The families live in the same New York apartment building, rent a house together in the summers and keep up a lively exchange of ideas about life and art, but the bonds between them are tested, first by sudden tragedy, and then by a monstrous duplicity that slowly comes to the surface. A beautifully written novel that combines the intimacy of a family saga with the suspense of a thriller, What I Loved is a deeply moving story about art, love, loss, and betrayal.

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A Retrospective

Sol LeWitt, one of the most important American artists of this century, has spent the past four decades creating artworks that explore the potential of ideas for the making of visual forms. LeWitt transforms these ideas into objects of exquisite beauty and elegance, deliberately introducing elements of chance, intuition, or irrationality into the systems that govern the creation of his works. LeWitt's delicate balancing act between thought and form, between order and disorder, between authorship and anonymity, has exerted an enormous influence on artists of subsequent generations. This book, the first retrospective of LeWitt's work in more than twenty years, fosters a deeper understanding of the artist's career and its significance to American art and thought. Including essays by Gary Garrels, Martin Friedman, Brenda Richardson, and other distinguished curators and art historians, the book charts the evolution of LeWitt's art from his groundbreaking work in Conceptualism during the early 1960s through his turn toward a more lyrical and sensual form of abstraction around 1980. With more than 350 images, the book provides a stunning visual survey of LeWitt's oeuvre from 1960 to the present, including sumptuous wall drawings, three-dimensional structures, and works on paper. This handsome book is the catalogue for an exhibition that will open at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art from 19 February through 30 May 2000, and will then travel to the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago from July to October and to the Whitney Museum of Art in New York from November to February 2001.

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Studienarbeit aus dem Jahr 2011 im Fachbereich Deutsch - Pädagogik, Didaktik, Sprachwissenschaft, Note: 2,0, Universität Leipzig (Erziehungswissenschaft), Veranstaltung: Textrezeption Kinder- und Jugendliteratur, Sprache: Deutsch, Abstract: Der Literaturunterricht in der Grundschule hat sich in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten stark in seiner Funktion verändert. Besonders Interpretationen, die Deutung von Stilmitteln und die literarische Ästhetik standen im traditionellen Literaturunterricht stark im Vordergrund. Der moderne Literaturunterricht ergänzt noch weitere Aspekte, z.B. die Vermittlung von Weltwissen und Erfahrungshorizonte[n], die in Geschichten künstlerisch verarbeitet sind. [...] Literatur [provoziert] Fragen, die dazu einladen, über sich selbst, seine eigene Lebenssituation, sein Selbstverständnis und [...] über Perspektiven von anderen nachzudenken (Waldt 2003: 103 f.). Um dies dem Schüler zu ermöglichen, bedarf es einer reflektierten Auswahl der Literatur seitens des Lehrers. Diese Seminararbeit stellt einen ersten Versuch der Autorin dar, ein Bilderbuch auf seine pädagogisch-didaktische Qualität zu beurteilen. Hierfür wählt sie das Buch Ente, Tod und Tulpe von Wolf Erlbruch. Es wurde im Seminar Textrezeption - Weiterführendes Lesen, Kinderliteratur, Kindermedien von Frau Prof. Riegler vorgestellt. Die Autorin selbst fand zu Beginn keinen Zugang zu diesem Bilderbuch und verstand nicht, weshalb es laut Überzeugung der Professorin für den Unterricht geeignet sei. Demzufolge wählte die Autorin dieses Buch, um es professionell in Augenschein zu nehmen. Der Leser erhält im folgenden Kapitel eine Einführung in das literarische Lehren in der Primarstufe. Darin verdeutlicht die Autorin die Bedeutung der korrekten Auswahl von Literaturmaterialien und gibt anschließend eine kurze Einleitung in die Bilderbuchart problemorientiertes Bilderbuch. Danach wird ein Leitfaden zur pädagogisch-didaktischen Beurteilung der Qualität von Bilderbüchern vorgestellt, an dem sich d

Found via: Ideal Bookshelf

First edition, first printing. Soft cover. Photographically illustrated laminated stiff wrappers with French folds (published only in wraps). 206 pp. with 70 black and white plates. The reproductions are absolutely exquisite. 11 3/4 x 9 1/2 inches. Foreword by Luis Monreal and essays (in English and Portuguese) by Kerry Brougher, Peter Hay Halpert, Jacinto Lageira and John Yau. Also includes an interview with Hiroshi Sugimoto by Helena Tatay Huici, an exhibition history, bibliography and exhibition checklist. Includes an exceptional collection of Sugimoto's dioramas, wax museums, theaters, drive-ins, day seascapes, night seascapes and a selection of images from the artist's work Hall of Thirty-Three Bays. One of the finest catalogues of Sugimoto's work published to-date, with a broad selection of all the series that have informed Sugimoto's work since 1976 (some previously unpublished, particularly the diorama series).

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Conceptual Forms

The meticulous practice of photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto (born 1948) is like that of a painter's. Inspired by Marcel Duchamp's obsession with the mechanics of space and the mathematical foundations of his works, such as "The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even" (or "The Large Glass"), Sugimoto photographed nineteenth-century mathematical models from the collection at the Komaba Museum at the University of Tokyo, which also features the third and last authorized replica of Duchamp's "Large Glass." Like the models that Man Ray photographed in the 1930s at the Institut Henri Poincaré in Paris, these objects also require a visual understanding of complicated trigonometry functions. This is the first publication to compare and contrast Sugimoto's photographs of mathematical models with his own mathematical models―computer-controlled precision tools made of aluminum.

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Essays and Arguments

In this exuberantly praised book - a collection of seven pieces on subjects ranging from television to tennis, from the Illinois State Fair to the films of David Lynch, from postmodern literary theory to the supposed fun of traveling aboard a Caribbean luxury cruiseliner - David Foster Wallace brings to nonfiction the same curiosity, hilarity, and exhilarating verbal facility that has delighted readers of his fiction, including the bestselling Infinite Jest.

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Winner of the 2001 National Book Award for Fiction

After almost fifty years as a wife and mother, Enid Lambert is ready to have some fun. Unfortunately, her husband, Alfred, is losing his sanity to Parkinson's disease, and their children have long since flown the family nest to the catastrophes of their own lives. The oldest, Gary, a once-stable portfolio manager and family man, is trying to convince his wife and himself, despite clear signs to the contrary, that he is not clinically depressed. The middle child, Chip, has lost his seemingly secure academic job and is failing spectacularly at his new line of work. And Denise, the youngest, has escaped a disastrous marriage only to pour her youth and beauty down the drain of an affair with a married man-or so her mother fears. Desperate for some pleasure to look forward to, Enid has set her heart on an elusive goal: bringing her family together for one last Christmas at home.

Found via: Ideal Bookshelf

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