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The year is 1973. As a freak winter storm bears down on an exclusive, affluent suburb in Connecticut, cark skid out of control, men and women swap partners, and their children experiment with sex, drugs, and even suicide. Here two families, the Hoods and the Williamses, com face-to-face with the seething emotions behind the well-clipped lawns of their lives-in a novel widely hailed as a funny, acerbic, and moving hymn to a dazed and confused era of American life.

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The self-interested disregard of a dying woman's bequest, an impulsive girl's attempt to help an impoverished clerk, and the marriage between an idealist and a materialist — all intersect at a Hertfordshire estate called Howards End. The fate of this beloved country home symbolizes the future of England itself in E. M. Forster's exploration of social, economic, and philosophical trends, as exemplified by three families: the Schlegels, symbolizing the idealistic and intellectual aspect of the upper classes; the Wilcoxes, representing upper-class pragmatism and materialism; and the Basts, embodying the aspirations of the lower classes. Written in 1910, Howards End won international acclaim for its insightful portrait of English life during the post-Victorian era.

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Celebrated as a leading figure of the German literary movement known as Sturm und Drang ("storm and stress"), Goethe made his reputation with this short novel, originally published in 1774. Its tale of a sensitive young man's self-destructive passion for a lover who ultimately rejects him was based in part on the author's own experiences, and the story's tragic resolution inspired a wave of suicides among young romantics throughout Europe. Goethe's portrayal of Zerrissenheit, "the state of being torn apart," in which a character struggles to reconcile his artistic sensibilities with the demands of the objective world, proved tremendously influential to subsequent writers, and The Sorrows of Young Werther continues to speak to modern readers.

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In celebration of its 25th anniversary, the bestselling classic is introduced to a new generation-with an added preface by Warhol's diarist and long-time friend, Pat Hackett, contemplating Warhol's lasting cultural impact.

This international literary sensation turns the spotlight on one of the most influential and controversial figures in American culture. Filled with shocking observations about the lives, loves, and careers of the rich, famous, and fabulous, Warhol's journal is endlessly fun and fascinating.

Spanning the mid-1970s until just a few days before his death in 1987, THE ANDY WARHOL DIARIES is a compendium of the more than twenty thousand pages of the artist's diary that he dictated daily to Pat Hackett. In it, Warhol gives us the ultimate backstage pass to practically everything that went on in the world-both high and low. He hangs out with "everybody": Jackie O ("thinks she's so grand she doesn't even owe it to the public to have another great marriage to somebody big"), Yoko Ono ("We dialed F-U-C-K-Y-O-U and L-O-V-E-Y-O-U to see what happened, we had so much fun"), and "Princess Marina of, I guess, Greece," along with art-world rock stars Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francis Bacon, Salvador Dali, and Keith Haring.

Warhol had something to say about everyone who crossed his path, whether it was Lou Reed or Liberace, Patti Smith or Diana Ross, Frank Sinatra or Michael Jackson. A true cultural artifact, THE ANDY WARHOL DIARIES amounts to a portrait of an artist-and an era-unlike any other.

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Architecture

Donald Judd's "specific objects" (as he termed them) undertook a revolutionary analysis and redefinition of sculpture, establishing him as a leading exponent of what came to be called Minimalism. Somewhat less known are Judd's numerous architectural and furniture designs, works which formally are closely related to his art objects, but which reflect his abiding interest in utility. In 1971, Judd bought an old fort near Marfa, Texas, and by systematically acquiring and transforming local property, he amassed a huge ensemble of contemporary art, with permanent installations of his own work and that of Carl Andre, John Chamberlain, Dan Flavin and others. Donald Judd: Architecture presents drawings, design sketches, ground plans and photographs of the grounds and architecture of this Minimalist desert oasis, and celebrates Judd's role as its visionary architect and stage director. This book first appeared in German in 1991, and has been thoroughly revised and expanded for this, its first English edition.

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Jerry McMillan's Photographs of Ed Ruscha 1958-1970

This catalogue was published in conjunction with the exhibition PICTURING ED: JERRY MCMILLAN'S PHOTOGRAPHS OF ED RUSCHA 1958-1972 at Craig Krull Gallery from May 22-June 26, 2004. The exhibition included forty-seven vintage photographic images of Edward Ruscha taken over the years by his good friend (and fellow Oklahoma City to L.A. transplant) Jerry McMillan. The catalogue is trimmed to the size of one of Ruscha's self published artist's books of the sixties and seventies and it contains an abundance of sweet & sexy pictures of Ed the artist, friend, husband, and dad.

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Set at a small, affluent liberal-arts college in New England at the height of the Reagan 80s, The Rules of Attraction is a startlingly funny, kaleidoscopic novel about three students with no plans for the future--or even the present--who become entangled in a curious romantic triangle. Bret Easton Ellis trains his incisive gaze on the kids at self-consciously bohemian Camden College and treats their sexual posturings and agonies with a mixture of acrid hilarity and compassion while exposing the moral vacuum at the center of their lives.

Lauren changes boyfriends every time she changes majors and still pines for Victor who split for Europe months ago and she might or might not be writing anonymous love letter to ambivalent, hard-drinking Sean, a hopeless romantic who only has eyes for Lauren, even if he ends up in bed with half the campus, and Paul, Lauren's ex, forthrightly bisexual and whose passion masks a shrewd pragmatism. They waste time getting wasted, race from Thirsty Thursday Happy Hours to Dressed To Get Screwed parties to drinks at The Edge of the World or The Graveyard. The Rules of Attraction is a poignant, hilarious take on the death of romance.

Note: FIRST PAGE OF TEXT STARTS IN MIDDLE OF A SENTENCE, THIS IS THE WAY IT IS SUPPOSE TO BE & INTENTIONALLY STARTS ON PAGE 13

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The Master who brought t'ai chi ch'uan to the West shows how Chinese exercises can lead to along and healthy life-- Offers practical, fully illustrated instructions in breathing and 50 essential t'ai chi ch'uan formsThis introduction to the benefits of t'ai chi ch'uan reveals in a reissued edition the powerful Taoist principles that have helped many to attain longer and healthier lives. Master Liu demonstrates various exercises designed to promote good digestion; maintain proper blood pressure; bolster the immune system; and prevent, or even cure, heart disease and cancer. This guide also covers Chinese foods, herbs, and teas.

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Introduction and Notes by John S. Whitley, University of Sussex. Wuthering Heights is a wild, passionate story of the intense and almost demonic love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff, a foundling adopted by Catherine's father. After Mr Earnshaw's death, Heathcliff is bullied and humiliated by Catherine's brother Hindley and wrongly believing that his love for Catherine is not reciprocated, leaves Wuthering Heights, only to return years later as a wealthy and polished man. He proceeds to exact a terrible revenge for his former miseries. The action of the story is chaotic and unremittingly violent, but the accomplished handling of a complex structure, the evocative descriptions of the lonely moorland setting and the poetic grandeur of vision combine to make this unique novel a masterpiece of English literature.

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Great Music, it said, and Great Poetry would like quieten Modern Youth down and make Modern Youth more Civilized. Civilized my syphilised yarbles.

A vicious fifteen-year-old droog is the central character of this 1963 classic. In Anthony Burgess's nightmare vision of the future, where the criminals take over after dark, the story is told by the central character, Alex, who talks in a brutal invented slang that brilliantly renders his and his friends' social pathology. A Clockwork Orange is a frightening fable about good and evil, and the meaning of human freedom. When the state undertakes to reform Alex to "redeem" him, the novel asks, "At what cost?" This edition includes the controversial last chapter not published in the first edition and Burgess's introduction "A Clockwork Orange Resucked."

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Interiors

The interior-design photographer Horst P. Horst is in the fifth decade of his career. Since the 1950s, after his apprenticeship to the pioneering modernist architect, Le Corbusier, Horst's photos have captured many of the classic interiors of the beau monde. Organized by decades, this book provides an overview of his accomplishments and a record of domestic taste over the last half-century. With text and interviews by Barbara Plumb, the book reflects the look of each different era, recording the flowering and the fading of trends. Among the rooms shown are those of Katharine Graham, Baroness Philippe de Rothschild, Gloria Vanderbilt, Valentino, Cy Twombley and Tatiana Franchetti, and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. The author's other books include "The `New York Times' Guide to Home Furnishings" and "Houses Architects Live In".

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