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Riffel and Rouart have drawn upon the rich collections at the Musée de la Toile de Jouy to produce this history of these textiles. The illustrations include original designs that are conserved in the museum, exceptional examples of Toile de Jouy clothing and furniture, documents relating to manufacture and to the founding company, and examples of contemporary uses of the textiles.

In the seventeenth century, printed and painted cottons from India first appeared in France. In reaction to the enormous commercial success of these bright Indian cottons, a French embargo was placed on the importation of foreign textiles. In 1759 this ban was finally lifted, and in 1760 the Manufacture Royale de Jouy was founded in Jouy-en-Josas, near Paris, to produce printed cotton fabrics on French soil that could compete with the popular imported ones.

At first the factory produced polychrome cottons with floral or plant motifs that were intended for clothing. Subsequently, the "monochromes" appeared; adorned with rural, historical, mythological, narrative, and oriental themes, they were used mainly for home furnishings. Within a few years, the factory was the biggest of its kind in Europe, and its printed textiles had become widely used in France and abroad. In all, some 30,000 designs were created at Jouy-en-Josas through the years, many of them the work of renowned eighteenth-century artists such as Fragonard and Boucher.

The authors, both curators at the Musée de la Toile de Jouy, have drawn upon the museum's rich collections to produce the first-ever complete history of these textiles. The illustrations include original designs that are conserved in the museum, exceptional historical examples of toile de Jouy clothing and furniture, documents relating to manufacture and to the founding of the company, and examples of contemporary uses of the textiles.

Toile de Jouy has become increasingly popular among designers and decorators, who incorporate its classic patterns in upholstery, wallpaper, bed linens, tablecloths, napkins, and stationery. For anyone interested in the history of textiles and design, or looking for fresh ideas for interior decor, this book will be an essential reference.

180 illustrations, 160 in color

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The Complete Work

This book is the first exhaustive work on Varvara Stepanova, one of the most significant visual artists in Russian history. It includes excerpts from Stepanova's diary and a wealth of newly discovered visual material to reveal an artist startling in her accomplishment. Lavrentiev recreates Stepanova's life and work against the complex background of the post-revolutionary period, covering every aspect of her oeuvre—graphic design, typography, textile, painting, poetry, set design, drawing, and collage.

In this first extensive study of her life and work, Varvara Stepanova (1894-1958) emerges as a remarkable artist whose versatility, energy, and contribution to the Russian avant-garde matched and in some cases exceeded that of her husband, Alexander Rodchenko.

The book is written and designed by Aleksander Lavrentiev, who is the grandson of Rodchenko and Stepanova and the curator of their archive. Lavrentiev's text is accompanied by excerpts from Stepanova's own diary, with its fresh insights and lively commentary on Soviet art, and a memoir by her daughter. But the real discovery is the 370 illustrations - 45 in color - nearly all of which are published here for the first time, which reveal an artist startling in her accomplishments.

Like Rodchenko, Stepanova was among the founders of Constructivism, a contributor to the famous Moscow 5 x 5 = 25 exhibition held in 1921, and significant in shaping Russian's visual culture during the turbulent years following the revolution. Lavrentiev covers every aspect of Stepanova's production against the complex background of the period. The comments in the little oilskin notebook that she kept almost continuously during the 1920s keenly revive the events of the time; the illustrations allow us to discover and enjoy the wide range of Stepanova's talents as expressed in paintings and geometric constructions, sets and costumes, fashion designs, posters, and typography.

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A Source Book of Design Reference Standards

The study of human body measurements on a comparative basis is known as anthropometrics. Its applicability to the design process is seen in the physical fit, or interface, between the human body and the various components of interior space.

Human Dimension and Interior Space is the first major anthropometrically based reference book of design standards for use by all those involved with the physical planning and detailing of interiors, including interior designers, architects, furniture designers, builders, industrial designers, and students of design. The use of anthropometric data, although no substitute for good design or sound professional judgment should be viewed as one of the many tools required in the design process. This comprehensive overview of anthropometrics consists of three parts.

The first part deals with the theory and application of anthropometrics and includes a special section dealing with physically disabled and elderly people. It provides the designer with the fundamentals of anthropometrics and a basic understanding of how interior design standards are established. The second part contains easy-to-read, illustrated anthropometric tables, which provide the most current data available on human body size, organized by age and percentile groupings. Also included is data relative to the range of joint motion and body sizes of children. The third part contains hundreds of dimensioned drawings, illustrating in plan and section the proper anthropometrically based relationship between user and space. The types of spaces range from residential and commercial to recreational and institutional, and all dimensions include metric conversions.

In the Epilogue, the authors challenge the interior design profession, the building industry, and the furniture manufacturer to seriously explore the problem of adjustability in design. They expose the fallacy of designing to accommodate the so-called average man, who, in fact, does not exist. Using government data, including studies prepared by Dr. Howard Stoudt, Dr. Albert Damon, and Dr. Ross McFarland, formerly of the Harvard School of Public Health, and Jean Roberts of the U.S. Public Health Service, Panero and Zelnik have devised a system of interior design reference standards, easily understood through a series of charts and situation drawings. With Human Dimension and Interior Space, these standards are now accessible to all designers of interior environments.

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1910-1932

The patterns and prints of the Wiener Werkstatte were among the most popular and successful textile designs of the early twentieth century, reflecting both the tastes of Viennese society and general trends toward artistic abstractionism. They are presented here in an unparalleled compilation.

A superbly illustrated volume that draws on the most comprehensive collection of Wiener Werkstatte designs in existence. The textile department of the Wiener Werkstatte was established seven years after the inauguration of this famous and highly influential Viennese association of artists and craftsmen. The demand for fabric designs for use by the fashion department and in interior decoration was met by original designs from some 100 artists, including the association's co-founder Josef Hoffmann and other leading figures such as Dagobert Peche, Carl Otto Czeschka, and Maria Likarz. Their creativity gave rise to one of the most remarkable legacies of modern textile design.

This book draws on the original gouache drawings, pattern books, and samples now in the collection of the Austrian Museum of Applied Arts, Vienna - truly remarkable archive of the over 1,800 recorded fabric designs. These range from the early rounded naturalistic motifs of art nouveau to later angular geometric designs associated with art deco. A wealth of reproductions, many in color, are supplemented by a catalogue of designs and photographs of fabrics in use in fashion, interior decoration, exhibitions, and the Wiener Werkstatte's own showrooms.

417 illustrations, 306 in color

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Album by Hannah Höch

As one of the protagonists of the Berlin Dada movement, Hannah Höch railed against tradition and conservatism in 1920s Germany. Höch and such cohorts as George Grosz and Raoul Hausmann raised anarchic revolution through cutting photomontage, nonsensical performance, and biting visual satire. A singular and important work in the artist's oeuvre is the so-called "Sammelalbum," which she produced and pasted together from found imagery for her own pleasure and use, circa 1933. In it, she arranged a choice selection of newspaper and magazine photographs cut from popular German magazines of the time, such as the Berliner Illustrirte and Der Dame. A diverse, allusive group of images they are, representing everything from her favorite film stars to oddly captured animals and toy dolls, nudes, landscapes, scenic travel vistas and synchronized dancers. By combining the collected pictures in continuous and sometimes contradictory sequences and double-page spreads, Höch created startling and often jarring photo collages. Never before published, Album can be considered to represent a heretofore unknown aspect of Höch's work, since its style of collage differs strongly from her well-known photomontages. This publication presents the entire Album in an exquisite facsimile reproduction, maintaining the filmic quality of its order and layout. In an accompanying essay, Gunda Luyken considers the content and history of the Album, locating it in the wider context of Höch's oeuvre.

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The Autobiography of Elsa Schiaparelli

“She knew everyone from Paris to Hollywood, collaborated with the Surrealists, and left her indelible mark on the world of fashion.” —Vogue

“She slapped Paris. She smacked it. She tortured it. She bewitched it. And it fell madly in love with her.”— Yves Saint Laurent

“A dress from Schiaparelli ranks like a modern canvas.”—Janet Flanner, The New Yorker

Elsa Schiaparelli (1890–1973) was one of the leading fashion designers of the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s. Her fascinating autobiography, first published in 1954, charts her rise from a rat-infested apartment in Rome, to success in fashion, through the war years when she worked for the American Red Cross, to her eventual role as designer to the stars.

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The Epic of Flight

The editors of Time-Life Books have produced another exciting series: The Epic of Flight. The Pathfinders are brought to you in extraordinary detail through vivid photography and engaging, informative text.

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The Lives of Women on the Frontier

Pioneer Women provides a rare look at frontier life through the eyes of the pioneer women who settled the American West. Linda Peavy and Ursula Smith vividly describe the hardships such women endured journeying west and making homes and communities on the frontier. Their hopes and fears and, most of all, their courage in the face of adversity are revealed in excerpts from journals, letters, and oral histories. Illustrated with a fascinating collection of seldom-seen photographs, Pioneer Women reveals the faces as well as the voices of women who lived on the frontier.

The authors portray a wide variety of women, from those who found liberty and confidence in undertaking "men’s work" to those who felt burdened by the wind, the weather, and the struggle of frontier life.

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Important Note about PRINT ON DEMAND Editions: You are purchasing a print on demand edition of this book. This book is printed individually on uncoated (non-glossy) paper with the best quality printers available. The printing quality of this copy will vary from the original offset printing edition and may look more saturated. The information presented in this version is the same as the latest edition. Any pattern pullouts have been separated and presented as single pages. If the pullout patterns are missing, please contact c&t publishing.

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Yoko Ono

"Yes Yoko Ono" accompanies the first major museum retrospective of the work of this pioneering avant-garde artist. In her prolific 40-year career, Ono has embraced a wide range of mediums, defying traditional boundaries and creating new forms of artistic expression. This volume is the first comprehensive art book devoted to her challenging and influential work.Yoko Ono has created revolutionary forms of music, film, and the visual arts since the 1960s, when she emerged as an avant-garde force in New York, Tokyo, and London. This richly illustrated book includes essays by eminent international scholars and critics that not only explore Ono's life and career, including her contributions to the Fluxus movement and Conceptual art, but also enrich our understanding of her complex role as artist, filmmaker, poet, composer, performance artist, activist, and rock star. An anthology of Ono's writings and an illustrated chronology further mark this book as the most extensive survey ever published on the art and life of Yoko Ono.The book includes a CD with new music by Yoko Ono, performed by Ono, her son Sean Lennon, and others.

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an Emerging Folk Art

From 1st page: "This collection of contemporary folk art comes mainly from the San Francisco Bay area, but it is representative of a much more generalized return to home-decorated functional objects. It comes from my own point of view - as an observer of its emergence and development, as a folk artist, and as a participant in the culture from which it springs. Many of us have hungered for a cultural identity strong enough to produce our own version of the native costumes of Afghanistan or Guatemala, for a community life rich enough for us to need our own totems comparable to African or Native American masks and ritual objects. The native funk and flash in this book tell us something of that hunger and what we are doing to fill it, as well as something of the meaning of those artifacts from other places and times. My hope is to make the consciousness behind these folk expressions more understandable and accessible to others and to stimulate people to experience for themselves the joy and fulfillment of making their own art for themselves."

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The design revolutions of the early 20th century created carpets of extraordinary vitality, and this pioneering work of scholarship places these dazzling examples of textile art at centre state during an exciting period in the history of decorative arts. The fruits of the flourishing Art Deco movement, not just in France but throughout Europe and the USA, form the first part of the book, while in the second, the focus turns to the reaction against the artistes-decorateurs by the champions of Modernism, and such influences as the Bauhaus, Cubism and collage. In 1927, the critic Rene Chavance identified carpet production as the most successful of the decorative arts in achieving 'the more visionary aims of the times'. Susan Day's exceptional book proves that these wonderful designer carpets still strike us today with their decorative power.

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Design, Techniques and Materials

Soft Jewelry --What is it? How is it made? How can jewelry be "soft"? You'll find the answers to these questions and more in this book. You'll find soft jewelry is a truly contemporary craft, as well as an art form; it doesn't require expensive metals or exotic materials; it can, and often does, use the human body as the sculptural model. Soft jewelry is lively, adventurous and spontaneous! Materials? You can use feathers or bones, fine fabrics like plush, suede or ordinary knitting yarn or pieces of discarded cloth, papers, leather and a host of materials found in our everyday lives. Experiment with fabrics; design your pieces around the innovative use of available materials! The techniques are easy to learn and often require simple tools or none at all. The techniques used are simple ones like knotting and tying, wrapping or off-loom weaving, knitting, crochet or stitching. Synthetic or natural materials, easy to learn techniques and imagination ---a combination available to "jewelry-makers" of all ages and talents! You are certain to find this medium a means of highly personalized expression. Nancy Howell-Koehler is a craftsperson and a teacher of special workshops in non-metallic jewelry.

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Africa, Asia, Oceania, America

A passionate interest and a lifetime spent seeking out the world's finest ethnic jewelry has contributed to making the Ghysels collection one of the premier collections of its kind in the world. Jean-Pierre and Colette Ghysels have indulged their passion indiscriminately, according as much attention to ethnographic objects as to extraordinary pieces of ethnic jewelry. They are guided by a single criterion: the quality that gives rise to beauty, a strict standard indeed, but one made possible by their longstanding familiarity with ethnic objects. A vast array of hair combs, pins, jewelry made to be woven into braids, nose rings, lip plugs, forehead ornaments and other related objects made out of the most diverse materials, many never before seen, are presented in beautifully composed photographs. The book is divided into geographical sections and includes 200 annotated photographs, a glossary, an index, maps, and a general bibliography. The author's essay describes the uses and meaning of the objects in different cultures and emphasizes the originality of the pieces.

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A heartbreaking story of victory, defeat, and of a spiritual search in a profane world, this is the story of Night Bear and his people. It is the tale of the land they cherish and the lives they hold sacred, lived until the enemy can no longer be stopped, and the dead have few left to weep for them.

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Masterpieces from a Lost Place

Since the 19th century, the women of Gee’s Bend in southern Alabama have created stunning, vibrant quilts. Beautifully illustrated with 110 color illustrations, The Quilts of Gee’s Bend includes a historical overview of the two hundred years of extraordinary quilt-making in this African-American community, its people, and their art-making tradition. This book is being·released in conjunction with a national exhibition tour including The Museum of Fine Art, Houston, the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Museum of Fine Art, Boston, The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Milwaukee Art Museum, The High Museum of Art, Atlanta, The Mobile Museum of Art, and The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art.

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Design is fundamental to our lives, for it is really about the making of things, which is the business of artists, scientists and technologists alike. All are concerned with innovation and problem-solving and can profit from a study of ideas developed in other disciplines. A minor classic since its first publication in the United States in 1989, this book examines some of the key principles of design and shows how these also underlie much of what we know of art, mathematics and science. It covers such topics as number, ratio and scale, rhythm and harmony, similarity and contrast, and suggests how these may relate to design problems.

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The Wearable Art Movement

The work of 175 of the most important American modernist artist jewelers appears in over 540 color and 35 black and white photos. Their story and jewelry is arranged chronologically and linked to four pivotal mid-cantury exhibitions. They comprise the modernist movement of wearable art directly and through their influence to the next generations.

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A bold reinterpretation of a century-old book

While shopping in the used-book store the Monkey's Paw in Toronto, Leanne Shapton happened upon a 1956 edition of the government reference book The Native Trees of Canada, originally published in 1917 by the Canadian Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources. Most people might simply view the book as a dry cataloging of a banal subject; Shapton, however, saw beauty in the technical details and was inspired to create her own interpretation of The Native Trees of Canada. Shapton distills each image into its simplest form, using vivid colors in lush ink and house paint. She takes the otherwise complex objects of trees, pinecones, and seeds and strips them down into bold, almost abstract shapes and colors: the water birch is represented as two pulsating red bulbs contrasted against a gray backdrop; the eastern white pine is represented by a close-up of its cone against a radiant summer sky.

The author of Was She Pretty? and Important Artifacts and Personal Property from the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, Including Books, Street Fashion, and Jewelry, Shapton puts forth yet another entirely new facet of her creative artistry.

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